Tagged: Industrialism

Iron and Glass Windows: Industrial Splendour

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The combination of glass and iron in design is very reminiscent of Victorian architecture. Some of my favourite buildings in this period were built with these materials, including London’s Crystal Palace, pictured above. This stunning piece of architecture was built in London’s Hyde Park to host the Great Exhibition of 1851. At the time of its construction, it included the most amount of glass ever used in a building. Resultantly, there was little need for interior lights as there was an abundance of natural lighting – hence Crystal Palace. Following the exhibition, the building was reconstructed in South London suburb, Sydenham Hill. It stood there until 1936 when it was sadly destroyed by a fire.

The design which was revolutionised in the industrial age still holds some inspiration for modern times. Windows made from steel and glass can work very well, especially in industrial inspired interiors. The thick steel lines which break up the extent of the glass add an interesting touch to the transparency. Below, I have selected some beautiful instances of this:

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Hard Drinker: Concrete Tumblers

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If you’re a dedicated follower of Glassed Blog, you’ll be more than aware of my penchant for minimal, industrial design. Simple and effective, these glasses from Uncrate are a beautiful example of that niche. The concrete section of the product works as an excellent base for a tumbler, providing a stability and weight that avoids spillage. The harshness of the concrete is counteracted by the simple delicacy of the glass top. The end product is a drinking glass that mixes masculinity and femininity in perfect proportions. A glass as elegant as this can be used for any kind of beverage.

Cloche Lamp SS13

Portable lamps aren’t something that you see too many of. The ability to transfer your light source from place to place is not something which is deemed necessary in the world of lamp design. There is a rare gem though, in this portable lamp from Plumo. The lamp is designed to be moved around and has a lengthy cord which means you can hang the lamp around anything close by. I especially like this product because the actual lamp has been upcycled from pretty, retro jars. It’d be as great an addition to a car garage as it would to a modern, industrial flat. Attractive, handy and good for the environment – this lamp has it all.

Friday Table Lamp by Richard Dienes

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German designer, Richard Dienes, has created this pendant lamp using tinted blown glass and pressed aluminium. The lamp is unique in that it can be utilised both as a suspending pendant lamp and a table lamp.

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I love the look of the raw simplicity of the lamp with the rugged decor in the photo above. If you’re a fan of industrial interiors, this is a must have item.

Z Gallerie – Crank Table

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This Crank Table from Z Gallerie is a perfect example of classic design meeting industrialism. The transparent glass surface enables the crank feature of the table to be the focal point, but offers a certain subtlety against the harsh, masculinity of the metal. I really like the crank feature which attaches the table top to the stand and enables you to adjust the height of the table. It has an ‘inside out design’, making visible what would conventionally be hidden. The curved table legs act in a similar way to the glass, restricting the strong crank feature from overbearing the design. Overall, it is a clever idea which has been designed to perfection.